Hidden in plain sight: The ghost cop cars of North Carolina that pull over unsuspecting drivers

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by kwflatbed, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. kwflatbed

    kwflatbed Subscribing Member MC1+MC2 +MC3 109K+Poster

    Hidden in plain sight: The ghost cop cars of North Carolina that pull over unsuspecting drivers
    • Ghosts cars, or stealth cars as some people call them, are marked police cruisers
    • The graphics and decals are barely visible during the day and are very faint
    • At night, the decals reflect but it allows police into neighborhoods discreetly
    • Three ghost cars have been used since 2013, new versions take over next week
    ByJames Gordon For Dailymail.com

    PUBLISHED:19:46 EDT, 16 April 2017|UPDATED:07:47 EDT, 17 April 2017



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    Drivers in North Carolina had better start sticking to the speed limit otherwise they risk being pulled over by police in 'ghost' patrol cars that are difficult to spot.

    Indian Trail police, just outside Charlotte, have been travelling the streets for years in vehicles that are known as 'ghost cars'.

    For although the cars are able to be seen clearly, the police markings are cleverly hidden so as to be virtually invisible to the human eye. Even the car's emergency lights are inside the vehicle.

    It means that many drivers don't spot the patrol cars until it is too late.

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    Although hard to see by day, the vehicle's markings are reflective and show up at night

    [​IMG]

    Drivers have a hard time seeing the low-profile police cars because they lack light bars atop the roof and sport white reflective markings

    'You gotta be able to get out and get into your environment and blend in and be able to catch the violator that you're looking for,' Captain Chase Coble of the Union County Sheriff's Office said toFox Carolina.

    'So it's super visible at night time for us, but in the daytime we can be a little bit more discreet whenever we're out in the community - and that helps us be in the right area at the right time to catch violators,' Capt. Coble said.

    The Sheriff's Office mainly use the cop cars to patrol the streets and deal with those breaking traffic laws, especially speeding motorists who behave differently in the presence of a police car.

    [​IMG]
    In daylight, this car looks solid black. But the ghost striping on the side is seen best at night, when car lights reflect upon it. This car is different to the white car seen in the other pictures

    [​IMG]

    Reflective graphics which blend into the white paint of the car, allow the vehicle to be classified as a marked police vehicle yet blend in with regular traffic.

    'These cars are amazing whenever you get out in traffic because people will fly right by you. They don't pay attention to it. They don't see it,' Capt Coble said.

    The key feature of all the 'ghost' vehicles are the white, reflective graphics which blend into the white paint of the car, allowing the vehicle to be classified as a marked police vehicle, yet still blend in with regular traffic during the day.

    The police say the tactics are not about generating revenue but to catch more drivers who are breaking the law speeding and running stop signs, to educate them better.



    'Some people get upset. Some people will kid around and say the ghost got me,' said Deputy Dak Richardson to Fox. He is keen to stress that the cars are really about increasing safety on the roads.

    'If we can make sure everybody goes home at nighttime safely and they get to their destination safe, obey by the law - we know we've done our job for the day,' Richardson said.




    Read more:The ghost North Carolina cop cars that pull over drivers | Daily Mail Online
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  2. Fuzzywuzzy

    Fuzzywuzzy MassCops Member

    They're catching on here too, I gotta tell ya if your headlights hit one parked on traffic watch at night they look like they're plugged in.
     
    Goose and FTH like this.

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