'Secure Communities' Immigration Checks Coming To Mass.

Discussion in 'Illegal Immigration Issues' started by cc3915, May 8, 2012.

  1. cc3915

    cc3915 Masscops Angel Staff Member

    BOSTON -- Federal immigration officials will activate the Secure Communities program in Massachusetts, despite objections from Gov. Deval Patrick.
    The controversial program electronically checks the fingerprints of everyone arrested and booked by state and local police against FBI and immigration databases.That allows federal immigration officials to seek to detain illegal immigrants for possible deportation.
    USMCMP5811 likes this.
  2. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

    Well I hope it does some good.
  3. kwflatbed

    kwflatbed Subscribing Member MC1+MC2 +MC3 91K+Poster

    Not if your name is Obama.
  4. Nuke_TRT

    Nuke_TRT Stirrer of the Pot

    or Auntie Zeituni
  5. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

    Yes very true.
  6. 7costanza

    7costanza Supporting Member

    It's a start.
    USMCMP5811 likes this.
  7. HistoryHound

    HistoryHound Supporting Member

    I'd feel better about if instead of "possible" deportation it was "automatic" deportation. If you're here illegally you've already broken the law. If you're arrested while here illegally; then, you've broken at least one other law. So, why should we allow someone who habitually breaks the law the possibility of staying here?
    Hush likes this.
  8. Herrdoktor

    Herrdoktor MassCops Member

    I was really skeptical of what effect, if any, ICE would be able to have on the illegal immigration community in this area.

    After a few years of immigration checks it's pretty obvious that the scum had started to move elsewhere.
  9. lofu

    lofu Subscribing Member

    Does this program really change anything? Don't we already call ICE anytime a person with no docs comes in under arrest?
  10. cousteau

    cousteau MassCops Member

    I give the government, whether state or federal, about a month before they say they are overwhelmed and understaffed, due to this program, that I strongly support. Last time I spoke with an ICE agent, he was completely not happy to be at our station and said how understaffed they were, and that was for one detainee. Send them back and make sure to cancel all their benefits. I can see Obama and Patrick allowing them to keep benefits and send checks to them.
  11. HistoryHound

    HistoryHound Supporting Member

    Simple solution, use the money saved when we cancel their benefits and they stop draining public service resources to hire more local police, state police and ICE agents. I know it'll never happen, but a girl can dream.
  12. cc3915

    cc3915 Masscops Angel Staff Member

    Secure Communties Guidelines

    Lowell, Ma (May 8,2012) Today an announcement was made that effective May 15th 2012 all communities in the State of Massachusetts will have to comply with the Secure Communties guidelines. 14 counties across the State will be effected. Barnsatble, Berkshire, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, Worcester and Middlesex counties have been notified. This will have no effect on how Lowell Police Department handles its fingerprints or information sharing. Once SC is deployed, the newly activated jurisdictions should continue their longstanding practice of sending fingerprints taken as a result of a criminal justice purpose to the State Identification Bureau who then will forward the submission to the Department of Justice’s FBI CJIS Division pursuant to state and local policies and procedures. The activation of SC does not in any way change local jurisdiction’s existing law enforcement or fingerprinting policies, procedures, or practices. The only new development that results from the activation of SC in the remaining jurisdictions is that, once the FBI CJIS Division receives the fingerprints for a search of the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Information System (IAFIS), they will send the fingerprints to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for a search of the Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT) System.
    Once received by DHS, the fingerprints will be compared to biometric information in the Department’s immigration databases. When there is a match, a trained ICE officer determines what, if any, immigration enforcement action may be appropriate. SC does not authorize local law enforcement agencies to enforce immigration law or task them with any additional responsibilities. In fact, following the activation of Secure Communities in the new jurisdictions, it is important that law enforcement agencies there enforce criminal law in exactly the same manner as they did before Secure Communities. It is equally important that departments of corrections in the new jurisdictions not change their operations in any way following the activation of Secure Communities.
    If ICE officers determine that an individual identified through Secure Communities may be removable, a detainer may be issued for that individual. The detainer requests the state or local jail facility to hold the individual for up to 48 hours (excluding weekends and holidays) beyond the time they would normally be released from custody. This is to provide ICE officers the opportunity to interview the person and/or take them into custody prior to the person being released into the community.
    ICE is committed to focusing its immigration enforcement resources in a manner that best promotes public safety, border security, and the integrity of the immigration system in all its enforcement programs, including Secure Communities. In practice, this means that ICE places a high priority on the removal of aliens convicted of crimes, recent illegal border crossers, immigration fugitives, and repeat immigration law violators. This prioritization, however, does not mean ICE will decline to remove other aliens identified through Secure Communities who are present in the United States without lawful authority.
    All determinations about whether to remove aliens identified through Secure Communities are made on a case-by-case basis, considering the unique circumstances of each case. In making these determinations, ICE considers factors such as criminal record, immigration history (including whether the person was previously deported or has an outstanding removal order from an immigration judge), family ties, duration of stay in the U.S., and significant medical and mental health issues. In cases that fall outside ICE’s immigration enforcement priorities, various forms of prosecutorial discretion may be considered on a case-by-case basis.
    Once SC is deployed, the newly activated jurisdictions should continue their longstanding practice of sending fingerprints taken as a result of a criminal justice purpose to the State Identification Bureau who then will forward the submission to the Department of Justice’s FBI CJIS Division pursuant to state and local policies and procedures. The activation of SC does not in any way change local jurisdiction’s existing law enforcement or fingerprinting policies, procedures, or practices. The only new development that results from the activation of SC in the remaining jurisdictions is that, once the FBI CJIS Division receives the fingerprints for a search of the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Information System (IAFIS), they will send the fingerprints to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for a search of the Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT) System.
    Once received by DHS, the fingerprints will be compared to biometric information in the Department’s immigration databases. When there is a match, a trained ICE officer determines what, if any, immigration enforcement action may be appropriate. SC does not authorize local law enforcement agencies to enforce immigration law or task them with any additional responsibilities. In fact, following the activation of Secure Communities in the new jurisdictions, it is important that law enforcement agencies there enforce criminal law in exactly the same manner as they did before Secure Communities. It is equally important that departments of corrections in the new jurisdictions not change their operations in any way following the activation of Secure Communities.
    If ICE officers determine that an individual identified through Secure Communities may be removable, a detainer may be issued for that individual. The detainer requests the state or local jail facility to hold the individual for up to 48 hours (excluding weekends and holidays) beyond the time they would normally be released from custody. This is to provide ICE officers the opportunity to interview the person and/or take them into custody prior to the person being released into the community.
    ICE is committed to focusing its immigration enforcement resources in a manner that best promotes public safety, border security, and the integrity of the immigration system in all its enforcement programs, including Secure Communities. In practice, this means that ICE places a high priority on the removal of aliens convicted of crimes, recent illegal border crossers, immigration fugitives, and repeat immigration law violators. This prioritization, however, does not mean ICE will decline to remove other aliens identified through Secure Communities who are present in the United States without lawful authority.
    All determinations about whether to remove aliens identified through Secure Communities are made on a case-by-case basis, considering the unique circumstances of each case.
    Our commitment to our community remains steadfast. The Lowell Police Department with its community based policing will continue to work to make this city a safe place to live for all its residents.

    http://www.lowellpolice.com/blog/?p=352
  13. 7costanza

    7costanza Supporting Member

    Did anyone catch Devals statment about this on the news, man what planet are these clowns living on.

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