US Navy SEAL killed in Somalia

Discussion in 'Military News' started by kwflatbed, May 6, 2017.

  1. kwflatbed

    kwflatbed Subscribing Member MC1+MC2 +MC3 109K+Poster

    US Navy SEAL killed in Somalia
    By Lucas Tomlinson

    Published May 05, 2017
    Fox News
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    A U.S. Navy SEAL was killed Thursday fighting terror group Al Shabab -- Al Qaeda's third-largest affiliate -- in Somalia, U.S. officials told Fox News.

    It appeared to be the first combat death of a U.S. service member in Somalia since 1993, U.S. Africa Command spokesman Patrick Barnes said.

    Two other SEALs and an interpreter were wounded in the gunfight in Somalia, Fox News has learned; however, the Pentagon would not disclose the extent of the injuries due to privacy concerns.

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    "U.S. forces were conducting an advise and assist mission alongside members of the Somali National Army" near Bari, about 40 miles west of Mogadishu, according to a statement from U.S. Africa Command. The mission involved the use of U.S. helicopters and a Navy SEAL assault force partnered with Somalis.

    "This was their mission," said Pentagon spokesperson Capt. Jeff Davis, referring to the Somali troops.

    The SEALs were attacked "early" in the mission, not long after landing, and the Pentagon was still assessing if the mission -- targeting a "group of people" associated with attacks on Somalia's capital -- was a success. Despite a recent focus on the country by the Trump administration, the authority for the mission was given under orders issued by the Obama administration.

    "What occurred last night...was not anything new," Davis said.

    A Somali intelligence official confirmed the U.S. military operation to The Associated Press, saying extremist fighters mounted a stiff resistance against the soldiers.

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    Al Shabab "presents a threat to Americans and American interests," the U.S. Africa Command statement said.

    Somalia's new Somali-American president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed, last month declared a new offensive against Al Shabab, which is based in Somalia but has claimed responsibility for major attacks elsewhere in East Africa.

    In late March, the White House approved a Pentagon request to conduct offensive operations against Al Shabab in Somalia. This meant drone strikes and raids were given the green light to happen outside of self-defense, which was the previous policy under the Obama administration.

    The Department of Homeland Security in March banned electronics larger than mobile phones on flights from some Muslim nations to the U.S. a year after Al Shabab attempted to bring down an airliner in Somalia using a bomb hidden inside a laptop.

    The extremist group, which was chased out of Mogadishu years ago, but continues to carry out deadly attacks there, has vowed to step up the violence in response to the moves by Trump and Mohamed.

    Pressure is growing on Somalia's military to assume full security for the country as the 22,000-strong African Union multinational force that has been supporting the fragile central government plans to leave by the end of 2020.

    Fighters linked to ISIS are a relatively new and growing challenge in the north of the country, which has seen a quarter century of chaos since dictator Siad Barre fell in 1991.

    The United States pulled out of Somalia after 1993, when two helicopters were shot down in Mogadishu and bodies of Americans were dragged through the streets.

    However, there have been roughly 50 U.S. special operations troops based in the country since 2013.

    US Navy SEAL killed in Somalia
     
  2. kwflatbed

    kwflatbed Subscribing Member MC1+MC2 +MC3 109K+Poster

    Pentagon identifies U.S. Navy operator killed in Somalia
    [​IMG] |
    Updated: 12:49 PM EDT May 6, 2017
    [​IMG]
    WMTW News 8

    The Associated Press

    FALMOUTH, Maine —
    On Saturday the U.S. Department of Defense announced the death of Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator Kyle Milliken.

    The department did not specify the exact cause of death but say Milliken died earlier this week during an operation against al-Shabaab militants who are linked to al Qaeda.

    The Department of Defense has issued a statement on behalf of the Milliken family that reads, "The Milliken family would like to extend their gratitude to the community for their interest in our beloved Kyle."

    It goes on to say, "He was a devoted father and son, a true professional and a wonderful husband. While we appreciate your interest, we ask you respect our need for privacy."

    According to the Pentagon, the 38-year-old from , 38, of Falmouth, Maine, was on assignment with the the East Coast-based special warfare unit in a remote area 40 miles west of Mogadishu.

    He was assisting in a Somali National Army-led operation with U.S. Africa Command in which two other service members were wounded.

    U.S. Africa Command spokesman Patrick Barnes told ABC News Milliken's death is the first U.S. combat death in the Somali conflict since 1993.

    Timothy Szymanski, a unit commander, remembers Milliken as "embodying the warrior spirit and toughness infused in our very best Navy SEALs."

    Both the United States and Somalia in recent weeks have declared new efforts against al-Shabab. President Donald Trump has approved expanded military operations against the extremist group, including more aggressive airstrikes and considering parts of southern Somalia areas of active hostilities.

    Somalia's new Somali-American president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed, last month declared a new offensive against al-Shabab, which is based in Somalia but has claimed responsibility for major attacks elsewhere in East Africa.

    Also last month, the U.S. military announced it was sending dozens of regular troops to Somalia in the largest such deployment to the country in roughly two decades. The U.S. Africa Command said the deployment was for logistics training of Somalia's army.

    The U.S. in recent years has sent a small number of special operations forces and counterterrorism advisers to Somalia and carried out a number of airstrikes, including drone strikes, against al-Shabab.

    Pentagon identifies U.S. Navy operator killed in Somalia
     

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